Category Archives: Influence

Mindful Interviewing – How to be a great interviewer

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I work as an agile coach and a coach interview can be a very interesting experience, irrespective of which side of the table you are. This is primarily due to the unique experiences that can influence the interview experience. Not to mention, an interviewer has an upper hand given that s/he is the decision maker. I have been an interviewer for about 50+ candidates in the last 1+ year and recently went through the experience of being interviewed.

The experience of being interviewed presented me with an opportunity to introspect and assess the experience of being on either side of the table. Rather the interview gave me insight into what I should NOT be doing as an interviewer. At the end, I came up with the following key aspects of the interview process. Note that suggestions below focus on the behavioral and soft skills aspects of the interviewer and by no means are limited to the Agile Coach interview only.

Have a conversation and never take over – Great interviews are about great conversations. Interviewers can get tempted to ask questions in areas that they are most comfortable in, and in the process take over the conversation. This can easily turn into a self-boasting speech leaving the candidate high and dry with no opportunity to express self.

Be conscious about presenting the candidate with the opportunity to share stories and ideas in order to gauge his/her experience and job fit.

Listen – Listening can be the simplest but trickiest part of a conversation. The use of words, the body language, the tone can go a long way in conveying a whole lot about the interviewee. Flexible listening can help judge the need for cross-questioning, further probing or moving to a different topic.

Additionally, the ability to inject an unexpected pause can be a powerful tool in extracting more information on a topic being discussed.

As described by journalist Jim Lehrer:

“If you resist the temptation to respond too quickly to the answer, you’ll discover something almost magical. The other person will either expand on what he’s already said or he’ll go in a different direction. Either way, he’s expanding his response, and you get a clear view into his head and heart.”

Refrain from creating a perception too soon – Looking at a candidate’s profile on LinkedIn, reading through the recommendations etc is a common way to know about the candidate ahead of time. While this is a great approach to gauge his/her experience and standing, one should not create a perception of the candidate on the basis of this information.

The beauty of perception is that you can adjust it based on your needs. Since perceptions can be a result of someone else’s opinion, it can limit the flexibility your mind can offer in assessing the candidate. So, focus on findings and leave perceptions aside.

Beware of how what book you are reading influences the interview – People like me who are avid readers constantly come across new ideas and opinions on topics. While these ideas and opinions are not ours, we can easily make them our own and throw it across to the interview to assess what they think. However; if you feel the topic is relevant and there is value in having a conversation, be transparent and mention the book and invite their opinion.

Refrain from selling the idea as your’s with an intention of demeaning the candidate. Be conscious of why you are bringing up the point and clarify expectations.

Be Curious – Curiosity is one of the most simple and most important attributes of a great interviewer. Curiosity influences how people are perceived and changes the mindset from that of someone looking at the negative aspects versus someone who is always curious and looking for opportunities and experiences to learn and grow.

As Dale Carnegie famously explains in his book titled “How to win friends and influence people”, the beauty of curiosity is that it makes you nearly irresistible to everyone around you.

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Understand personality and style – One of the first things I do at the start of the interview is to ask the candidate to share his/her style of coaching and anything else that tells me about the personality that they carry. This helps set the stage for the questions and scenarios that follow. It also provides an opportunity to assess gaps in the style and personality explained and what emerges from the conversations to follow. While there can be commonalities in styles and personalities enforced through processes in technical or engineering roles when it comes to consulting, every individual has a unique style that typically works in alignment with the personality and in their unique circumstances.

I consider myself an introvert and have my own style which is based on empathy, relationships and ultimately a strong partnership which might be interpreted differently by an extrovert interviewer or someone with a strong personality.

Understand the personality up front for a more engaged conversation later.

Don’t forget your role as an interviewer – It can be quite easy for an interviewer to get on to a self-boasting ride and in the process loose opportunity to listen and assess the candidate. It is critical to remind yourself that you are the interviewer and the purpose of being together is to assess the person in front of you.

Throwing across your opinions, your style, and your solutions will lead to a one-way conversation. This might give you a temporary feeling of a winner but the core objective of the interview would have been lost.

Suspend your ego – Ego suspension is essential in cultivating the kind of curiosity that helps you connect with the person in front of you. Creating the opportunity for the interviewee to disagree with you is critical for a constructive conversation.

As author Tom Wolfe puts it, “the world is full of people with information-compulsion who want to tell you their stories. They want to tell you things that you don’t know. They’re some of the greatest allies that any writer has.”

Feedback – Not providing feedback or discussing next steps can be both rude and unprofessional. Getting feedback from the interviewer presents the opportunity for the interviewee to ask clarifying questions and in some cases remove any miscommunication that might have occurred during the discussion. In fact getting feedback about the interview from the candidate is easily important to enhance the experience for the next candidate.

To close out, while you read all the above points about the interview; wearing an interviewee’s hat will help assess the importance in a much better way.

Please share, like and leave a comment if you like this post.

Read this and other posts on my LinkedIn profile.

 

 

 

 

How value drives behavior

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Being a coach, the term value has become an integral part of my vocabulary, so much so that I feel it drops of my mouth a couple thousand times each day. As I watch people around me do stuff each day, my mind would subconsciously want to know the value of their action. However, thankfully I have managed to somehow keep the question limited to my actions and limit all the data my mind needs to process each day.

As much as this has been helpful, the value conversation keeps coming up as part of my engagement with my clients and people. The more I question the value of something, the more I realize that what we value defines how people act.

As a consultant, I do a lot of travel. Coming home at the end of the week, carrying the baggage of all the good and bad that has occurred during the week, one thing that used to impact me the most was the condition of my house. If my family room was a mess or the game room had stuff lying all around, I know and my family knows that I won’t be very happy. So on the day of my arrival home, some effort is spent on ensuring that the house is in order. This does not mean that the house was that way all week long. It is a weekend phenomenon. What is worth noticing is that something that I value has changed how my kids reach on the day I come home but it has not necessarily influenced them to keep the house in order all week long. They want to keep the noise away when I am around.

There are similar observations that I have from the companies and teams I have coached. If the leader values is a good looking power point (green) status report, that is what the everyone spends all the time creating. What is worst is how it impacts how managers apply control on their teams to make sure things stay green. They don’t want to be exposed and vulnerability is not an option. Additionally, this causes decision making to happen not where the skills are because value is not based on trust but the force that is exerted to produce what the leader cares about.

So if you are a leader (not a manager), what is valuable to you or maybe a better question is, what is it like working for you? When your teams talk about value, do they talk about power points or the product we are trying to build or the service that your customer cares about. Think about it because what you say will impact how people think, behave, eat, drink and sleep.

BTW, my weekends are now spent cleaning up the house. If that is valuable for me, I got to make it happen and hopefully will inspire them.

When a plumber gave a crash course in consulting

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Source: rlmconsulting.be

 

The idea of consulting is typically associated with an individual with certain specialized skills that makes him an expert in an area. While the term “consultant” is generally associated with high profile areas of specialization, other kind of areas fit rather well into the definition of a consultant.

A close friend was recently sharing his experience where he needed to call in a plumber to a fix a leak behind a wall, however; he also went about researching the internet about how to solve the problem. Not to mention he used certain keywords while searching like “cheap ways”, “quick ways” and some more. He also searched for specific information about how plumbers have a tendency to exaggerate the problem towards generating a high margin. As it was time for the plumber to arrive, he was ready with how the problem should be fixed, what tools would be needed, how he would ensure that the fix was successful and steps he would take to shield himself from getting ripped.

screen-shot-2017-02-28-at-11-19-47-amThe plumber who seemed like a master in his trade had other thoughts. He was quick to diagnose the problem and suggest the fix which obviously was different from what my friend was expecting. During this period, the plumber was patiently listening to all the research that was done. There was some back and forth and the plumber left without fixing the problem.

Human mind is constantly engaged in the activity of forming opinions about people, society, profession etc. We try to appear smart, knowledgeable and experienced in the most unknown territories. This isn’t necessarily because every human knows everything but because we feel uncomfortable with how the person in front of us will perceive us if we said “I don’t know”. At the same time, this behavior does change in situations when the outcome has a higher degree of risk involved. For example, talking to a doctor about a possible fix to an ailment, we tend to trust the doctor to make the right decision with the end objective of a successful and full recovery. We do not even want to confront the doctor if what our research suggests is otherwise.

While organizations like to have control over what and how consultants solve problems, consultants needs to exhibit certain characteristics and ethics to justify the value for the price paid. Below are some characteristics that identify great consultants from the rest:

  • Listen – A consultant’s first strategy to build confidence is by listening and paying close attention. The 5 stages of listening (receiving, understanding, evaluating, remembering, and responding) supported by active listening (a technique that required the listener to provide feedback of what he or she hears to the speaker) help in empathizing with the situation and subsequently providing solutions or asking relevant questions.
  • Comfortable saying “No” – The fact that consultants are experts in their field gives them a upper hand in making recommendations that are based on skills, knowledge and experience. This also implies that addressing the problem in hand using the right means takes precedence over other measurements including doing things a certain way to keep the client happy. As an expert, a consultant should feel comfortable to disagree with the customer and provide evidence to support it.
  • Align strategic goals and measurements of success – Engagement of a consultant suggests that a certain expertise is needed in order to address a problem which the organization is unable to address by itself. In such a scenario, it becomes vital to understand the strategic goal behind engaging a consultant and the measurements of success both long term and short term. Often these discussions never take place and consultants are asked to follow orders and paint a picture that is expected.
  • Challenge and persist – Great consultants don’t give up. They accept frictions, unforeseen circumstances and negative feedback, they learn from them and they move on. They will analyze and learn from every setback in order to prevent it from happening again.
  • Do not get ahead of yourself – Being a consultant in a specific area does not mean that one works on the same set of problems. For example; the symptoms for the doctor to diagnose a problem can vary from patient to patient. A doctor cannot afford to assume that the second patient has the same problem as the first one given that the symptoms are same. Think and assess before giving a reference to how you faced similar challenges in the past and how they were addressed. Assessment of the problem along with creative thinking should happen before influencing the solution approach.
  • Expose problems and facilitate solutions – Consulting done by providing immediate solutions to problems is done with an intention of creating dependency. A great consultant refrains from providing solutions and instead helps in exposing problems so the organization can solve the problem itself. It is impractical for a consultant to get into a problem solving mode having been with the organization for a short period of time. Instead, a great consultant will use enquiry and facilitate conversations to expose problems so organizations can find the best possible solution(s).
  • Have a exit strategy – A consultant needs to have a well defined exit strategy which should be looked at all along the duration of the engagement. Exit can be a result of a successful solution of a problem or completion of the engagement or a realization where the consultant cannot fathom the value to be added. Either way, exit at the right time goes a long way in building trust with the customer and ensuring a long term relationship. As it a said, the greatest measurement is success if by how soon a consultant can work him/herself out of a job leaving behind a organization that is self sufficient.
  • Maintain transparency – Consultants need to feel comfortable sharing both the good and bad news. Consultants are bought in for a reason that things are not working in the first place. Given the high rates consultants get paid, some consultants refrain from or delay sharing bad news with the client assuming they will address the problem without bringing it to the notice of the customer. The fact is that most issues exposed sooner than later. Consultants should establish transparency as the key criteria of their relationship with the customer right at the start of the engagement. If this is done, a bad news will not come as a surprise for the customer and will only help in building trust and ensure ongoing collaboration in addressing issues and risks.
  • Accept you don’t know it all – Not knowing everything is normal, however; accepting that I do not know everything is difficult. No matter how experienced or qualified a consultant is, s/he will run into situations where the consultant might not have a opinion or an answer. This isn’t necessarily bad news. Acknowledging that I do not know something and then making an effort to research the solution elevates the relationship and provides opportunity to learn something new.

Consulting in the area of business, technology and other recent areas of innovation has forced other business like staffing to get into the consulting fold. Individuals and so called consulting organizations have started using the term rather loosely. While this has resulted in smoke around who consultants are what they do, it is important that consultants practice the above characteristics to bring some credibility back to the professional of consulting and help organization realize the benefits of value consultants offer.

If you are a consultant who exhibits a characteristic not captured here, I would love to hear from you. Please leave a comment below. Happy Consulting..

My podcast interview about Agile, Scrum and the Scrum Master role

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Image courtesy: cbc.ca

I am excited to share my latest podcast interview with Vasco Duarte where we discuss about agile and Scrum and get into details about the Scrum Master role all through this week. This podcast was recorded for the site http://scrum-master-toolbox.com/ to discuss various topics around challenges related to the Scrum Master role, some anti patterns to Scrum, change leadership, measurements of success for Scrum Masters and agile culture and mindset.

First 2 episodes are live now. Don’t forget to watch the upcoming 3 episodes (Wednesday through Friday) this week.

Please provide your feedback on the podcast, leave comments and like. Also reach out for any questions or if you would like to record a podcast for your site.

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Opinions as impediments. How to have an opinion and share it.

 

 

Screen Shot 2016-06-28 at 10.56.26 PMHaving an opinion is human. Thought we assume that opinions are regulated by common sense, that is generally not the case. Our entire world is about opinions. We can have a opinion about any and every thing around us, for example; Donald Trump and the US elections in general, opinion about BREXIT and its impact on the world economy and when we have nothing more, we move to creating opinions about people around us. Good or bad, a significant amount of human brain processing power is spent in forming opinions.

Even thought opinions are not necessarily bad, they do have a negative impact if an opinion is formed with a intention of imposing your thoughts on the other person or to demean someone. Additionally, forcing opinion and conveying it as a decision due to your position in the organization or the type of personality you are, takes the impact of your opinion to the next level, where it makes a conversations one sided and forces the other person to eject from the conversation.

Having said that, opinions are not going away. Human mind will continue to analyze situations and people and form opinions based on our experience, knowledge and personal objectives. This does become an issue with teams trying to foster collaboration. How often do you see an Architect telling a team on how a product should be designed killing the creativity of the team or how often do we see a leader force a team to build something that the team know will not add value to business.

Here are some guiding principles that will allow you to not only form a opinion with the right intent but be able to communicate it and leave a positive impression:

  • An opinion is a opinion – A dictionary definition of opinion is a belief or judgment that rests on grounds insufficient to produce complete certainty”. An opinion when communicated as a decision or expert judgement is totally different and hence it becomes critically important for an opinion to be conveyed that way. A good way to share an opinion is to start by saying “this is just how I think and I am happy to be proven wrong”. Being passionate about your views is admirable, but never expect anyone to abandon his or her own thoughts in favor of yours.
  • It is ok to NOT know everything – The key reason why humans are forced into having an opinion is because they do not want to come across as ignorant or unaware about what is being discussed especially when it is current hot topic in politics, sports, technology etc… However; it is ok to not know everything. So in a situation like this, retain your opinion till the time you can ask to be explained more about the topic or if your opinion is requested.
  • Start by sharing the intent – If you feel strongly about something and have a strong opinion, start by sharing the intent. Most opinions result in a negative impact on relationships be at work or family and its outcome can be brutal if relationships and partnerships are formed and end purely based on opinions without either party initiating a conversation to validate opinions. If you cannot come up with an intent to form an opinion or are not ready to validate, opinions can be destructive. Your opinion might hurt some feelings or provoke some criticism, but sharing ideas is how conversations start, communities are formed, and change happens.
  • Who/What is your opinion about – Opinions can be about people, products and opinions can be about opinions. Be cautious if you opinion is about someone who you do not get along with or someone who does not give your opinion adequate weight. Such opinions tend to involve your emotional side and can go a long way and influence the whole objective of having an opinion.
  • Argue internally – Treat your urge to form an opinion as an internal argument with yourself, a mental debate, so to speak. Consider your knowledge on the subject, your intention behind having the opinion and the value your opinion will bring before your speak up. Let go if you are unable to convince yourself.
  • Can you back your opinion with facts – Being able to back your opinion with facts is important. Base your opinion on an article your read or research your did or something you saw on the social media or anything else so that your opinions are heard.
  • Assess if your opinion is really needed – Do you remember the last time you walked into a conversation, listened briefly and in no time shared your opinion about something and were told that you got it all wrong. It has happened with me. Understand that you were not part of the conversation in the first place because your opinion does not carry enough weight and that is fine.

Opinions can and will evolve; sometimes at the risk of reshaping your reputation and credibility. And as much as you are entitled to them, don’t hold on to them too tightly. Opinions have a way of being infused with our dignity – it makes us think that if we change our opinion, them we’re flimsy or weak, when in fact it is a very natural process, kind of like growing up.

Just make sure that your opinion forces constructive and creative thinking, and don’t be afraid to share it.

Chaos with complexity – How to cope with organizational complexity

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Image source: http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk

Systems, structures and processes are becoming complex by the day. Generally speaking, human life has reached that level of complexity which makes you question the existence of all the innovation and automation around us.

For the decision makers, environments that were isolated years ago, are bumping into each other causing unexpected results. This causes more decision points getting added into structures and processes causing unintentional  addition to already complex environments.

I was recently watching a TED talk by Yves Morieux titled How too many rules at work keep you from getting things done. In his talk, Yves presents an example of a 4X100 relay race. The name 4X100 relay conveys that each member of the team is expected to run a distance of 100 meters. However; this does not mean that the team member drops the baton exactly at the 100 meters mark. Most athletes end up running on an average 110 meters and most athletes don’t know how much they have run as their focus is to hand over the baton to the next member of the team and achieving the goal of completing the race.

If we were to consider a relay race example in context of an organization, there are specific roles for specific tasks. Arguments over whose responsibility was it to get something done are very common. Again, staying with the relay race example, since a member of the team has only signed up to run 100 meters, organizations end up adding a role that is responsible for passing the baton from one team member to another. The result of this approach is increase in structural complexities and a culture of local optimization.

So how do organizations cope with the complexity or what behaviors would keep complexity in check. Here are some guidelines:

  • Purpose and values – Every role in the organization has a value and purpose. This is how most roles get created but the focus needs to be about the collective purpose of the team or organization. Similar to the relay race example where finishing the race and doing whatever it take to finish first is the ultimate goal. Individual goals do not ensure team success.
  • Decentralize authority – Once shared purpose and values have been established, next step is to decentralize the authority. A relay team might have a leader/captain, someone with experience and leadership attributes, but when it comes to taking a decision during the race, every athlete makes decision keeping the end goal of winning the race in mind. In the end, it is the team that wins and it is the team that loses.
  • Early awareness of unpredictable situations – When dealing with complexity, one needs to identify the variables that create predictable outcomes when they’re within a particular range, and unpredictable outcomes when they are not. In a relay race scenario, weather plays a crucial factor. Teams alter the sequence of the participating team members or make similar adjustments to ensure that the collective team keeps the focus on the end goal. The decisions made are generally subtle and not drastic to ensure last minute adaptation does not impact the overall probability of the team winning the race.
  • Leadership – Leading a complex organization requires an entirely different mindset. Hierarchy works if every level is doing something distinct and specific. However, due to the interdependence in complexity, this is impossible in today’s organizations. By simplifying and clarifying vision and values, core processes and decentralization, and early awareness systems, hierarchy can be complemented by “heterarchy”, the interdependent, networked organization in which every part reflects a different perspective of the whole and which is needed in today’s global business world. The boss no longer needs to “tell” the team members what exactly to do, but rather depend on their initiative, creativity and competence for success. So, next time your team faces a challenge, do not create additional complexity, but trust the team to make the right choice. Teams generally appreciate a nimble setup.
  • Simplify and cleanup – An easy starting point for simplification is to get rid of stupid rules and low-value activities, time-wasters that exist in abundance in most organizations. Look, for example, at how many people need to review and sign off on expense reports; or how many times slide decks need to be reviewed before they are presented. If you can shed a few simple tasks, you will create bandwidth to focus on more substantial simplification opportunities.

So, every time you fix a problem, look at the solution you are proposing and ask yourself a question, “Am I fixing a problem or creating more chaos with complexity?”.

 

Connect with me for FREE lunch-n-learn, lean coffee or open space sessions

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Image source: soyouthinkyoucanteachesl.com

Improving’s involvement in the agile community in the DFW area is second to none. We pride ourselves for being the bridge between the leaders and learners so that the community continues to connect and grown in their area of interest.

If your organization is in the middle of a agile journey or thinking of embarking on the journey, you have questions or concerns and looking for guidance on product design, agile teams, frameworks or you would like to just connect, contact me for a FREE lunch-n-learn or lean coffee or open space session with me.